Behind the Mission: Race and Inclusion at the World Bank Group

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Behind the Mission: Race and Inclusion at the World Bank Group

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Race is a key component to the diversity, equity, and inclusion agenda at the World Bank Group. As February is Black History Month in the U.S., this episode of Behind the Mission is about Race and Inclusion at the World Bank Group.

During this show, we talk with two leaders from the World Bank, Daryl Lucas and Nadine Chapman, who will share their stories, insights and the work that the Bank is doing to address racism and create opportunities for racial minorities, including African Americans. They’ll also share some helpful tips on navigating a successful career at the World Bank Group.

Join us on Feb. 8 at 11am EST to listen to the conversation. Please submit your questions now, and experts will answer your questions during the show.

“​Racism exists everywhere, including the World Bank Group, so having a 360 degree perspective of where and how changes can be made so people feel welcome to work at this institution is paramount.”

- Daryl Lucas

Use the following timestamps to navigate different sections of the video.

00:00 Welcome! Race and Inclusion at the World Bank Group
01:40 What the World Bank Group is doing around race and inclusion
05:09 Initiatives to attract African American professionals
09:09 How we can promote a culture of inclusivity from within
11:51 Careers: What do you think helps applicants stand out
13:47 Careers: Overcoming rejections and keep trying
17:11 The concept of "racial minority"
19:41 Addressing all other forms of discrimination
22:57 Advice for professionals wanting to apply and work with us
25:38 Thanks for joining this episode of #BehindTheMissionWBG

Speakers

Moderator

Read the transcript


  • 00:00 (music)
  • 00:15 [Srimathi Sridhar] Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening,
  • 00:17 and welcome back to Behind the Mission, our monthly series here where we talk about what
  • 00:21 it takes and what it's like to work in international development.
  • 00:25 I'm your host, Srimathi Sridhar, and I'm looking forward to guiding you through today's episode
  • 00:29 as we talk about race and inclusion.
  • 00:32 Today's episode is also a nod to Black History Month, which is celebrated in the United States
  • 00:36 and runs through all of February.
  • 00:38 For the World Bank Group, race is a key component to diversity and inclusion.
  • 00:42 So, to learn more about what the institution is doing on the race agenda, and to also hear
  • 00:47 some personal experiences, I'm delighted to be joined by Daryl Lucas, who's the director
  • 00:51 of HR Client Services, and Nadine Chapman, who's the manager of Mediation Services.
  • 00:58 Before we get into our conversation with Daryl and Nadine, I do want to remind folks to take
  • 01:02 advantage of the live chat section of today's episode, where we do have colleagues working
  • 01:07 behind the scenes to answer as many of your questions as possible.
  • 01:11 As always, you can always follow us along online using the hashtag #BehindtheMissionWBG.
  • 01:16 With that, let's get our conversation going.
  • 01:20 Daryl, Nadine, it's great to have you both today.
  • 01:23 Thanks so much for joining me.
  • 01:26 Let's dive in and start talking about what the World Bank Group is doing around race
  • 01:29 and inclusion.
  • 01:30 I mentioned this briefly in my introduction, but for the institution, race is a key component
  • 01:36 to our diversity, equity and also inclusion agenda.
  • 01:39 So, how would you say that the Bank Group has been addressing this issue, and what's
  • 01:45 been your personal experience?
  • 01:46 Daryl, let me start with you, and feel free to also introduce yourself before you answer
  • 01:51 the question.
  • 01:52 [Daryl] Sure.
  • 01:53 Thanks, Sri.
  • 01:54 My name's Daryl Lucas.
  • 01:55 I'm the director of client services for the World Bank.
  • 01:59 I think the institution has done several things.
  • 02:02 I think one of the things I'm most proud of is it starts with walking the talk and reiterating
  • 02:07 its commitment to diversity and inclusion, and seeing that there are high profile roles
  • 02:13 across the institution, whether it's our General Counsel, the managing director of IFC or senior
  • 02:18 vice president at MIGA, which is one of the institutions across the World Bank Group,
  • 02:24 having diverse figures across the organization that we can look up to, who participate with
  • 02:31 us as part of the diversity and inclusion agenda, I think is a very strong signal to
  • 02:35 all of us.
  • 02:37 But at the working level, we have embarked on a very tremendous campaign with the racism
  • 02:41 task force, which has brought staff across the World Bank Group to come together and
  • 02:46 really have bottom up solutions and ideas to help shape and inform ways that we can
  • 02:52 be even more attentive to diversity and inclusion at the World Group.
  • 02:56 I mean, racism exists everywhere, including at the World Bank Group and so to have a 360
  • 03:01 degree perspective of how and where changes can be made in real time so that people feel
  • 03:07 welcome to work at the institution is paramount.
  • 03:09 [Srimathi Sridhar] It really is.
  • 03:12 Thank you so much, Daryl.
  • 03:13 Nadine, let me now turn over to you and similar to Daryl, please feel free to give us a brief
  • 03:18 introduction of yourself before you answer the question.
  • 03:21 [Nadine] Hi, Sri.
  • 03:22 It is wonderful to be here, and I'm very excited to talk about this topic, which is very dear
  • 03:28 to my heart.
  • 03:30 To Daryl's point, I am the manager of mediation services.
  • 03:33 I joined the World Bank 22 years ago, which is hard to believe.
  • 03:37 So, I really have been part of the institution for a very long time and one thing I'm very
  • 03:43 proud to say to you is that racism at the World Bank and the World Bank's dedication
  • 03:49 to address the issue of racism is not new.
  • 03:53 It did not start with the murder of George Floyd.
  • 03:55 It's something that the institution has been working on for many years.
  • 03:59 I'm very proud to say that I have seen the diversity and inclusion office that was founded
  • 04:06 many years ago that has been addressing these issues for a long time.
  • 04:10 There are also many affinity groups of which I've been part of that help to bring to the
  • 04:17 attention of senior management issues and concerns affecting staff of African descent.
  • 04:22 Also, we have regularly as an institution been open to and hosted numerous activities,
  • 04:29 including Community Connections, which is an annual campaign that we have each year
  • 04:34 where we donate millions of dollars, literally, to many organizations, many of which are based
  • 04:42 in the Washington DC area that are made up of organizations that serve people who are
  • 04:49 of African descent and other non-included groups.
  • 04:53 So, I'm very proud to say that the World Bank has always been very active.
  • 04:59 This is nothing new for the institution.
  • 05:02 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks, Nadine.
  • 05:04 You've both given us some really good examples of what we've been doing as an institution.
  • 05:09 Now that we have that better understanding of what the World Bank Group has been doing
  • 05:13 to support the race agenda, let's talk about specific initiatives that the institution
  • 05:17 has been implementing to help attract African American professionals.
  • 05:22 Have you found them successful?
  • 05:23 Nadine, let me start this question with you.
  • 05:27 [Nadine] Thank you for asking that, Sri.
  • 05:30 I will say that there have been numerous initiatives.
  • 05:35 One initiative that I'm aware of is in human resources, right in the human resources vice
  • 05:40 presidency.
  • 05:42 There have been targeted recruitments to attract people of African descent, and that recruitment
  • 05:48 effort has actually resulted in the hiring of many staff, not only in the World Bank
  • 05:53 but in IFC, who are of African descent.
  • 05:57 Personally, I'm very proud to and happy to share with you that there is a program called
  • 06:03 the Howard University Law School World Bank Group Experiential ADR Program, which I co-founded
  • 06:11 with the director of the ADR program at Howard University Law School.
  • 06:16 That program is now in its seventh year and we have had over 60 3rd-year law students
  • 06:23 from Howard University work in the World Bank Group for an entire year.
  • 06:29 Our goal with that is to not only expose the institution to a population that normally
  • 06:36 does not have access to the institution, but also to ideally build a future pipeline.
  • 06:42 Those are just merely two examples of many of programs that I personally have seen that
  • 06:49 have impacted not only the participants, but also the institution.
  • 06:54 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks so much, Nadine.
  • 06:57 Daryl, what about you?
  • 06:59 What initiatives have you found successful?
  • 07:02 [Daryl] Thank you very much.
  • 07:04 It's interesting.
  • 07:05 I think the outreach that we conduct on an ongoing basis, it has been proven to be very
  • 07:10 successful, primarily because, particularly in the Washington DC area where the World
  • 07:15 Bank is headquartered, we often make the assumption that people know what the World Bank does.
  • 07:20 And having senior managers go out and not only partner with universities and HBCUs or
  • 07:26 historically black colleges and universities, but spend an hour or 45 minutes doing a presentation
  • 07:31 or a discussion on what it really means in terms of how we play our role in poverty alleviation
  • 07:36 and boosting shared prosperity has proven helpful.
  • 07:39 It's allowed graduate students, for example, to start to establish networks, to learn more
  • 07:43 about the organization and become aware of opportunities that become available for them,
  • 07:48 whether they be internships or entry level positions.
  • 07:52 Additionally, the high school internship program is one that I feel is very successful because
  • 07:57 again, in our own backyard, Washington DC is an extremely diverse city and the ability
  • 08:03 to get young people, even before they've finished high school, to spend their summer working
  • 08:09 at the World Bank Group and understanding what we do is a great primer in helping to
  • 08:14 direct what they do in undergrad and then ultimately in grad school, in some instances.
  • 08:18 So, I think both of those have proven to be very successful.
  • 08:21 And then lastly, I think the formal and informal mentoring systems that are established around
  • 08:27 the World Bank.
  • 08:29 It's a large organization to some, and you may feel like you are the only one there that
  • 08:35 has your circumstances, and having a mentor or a coach or someone to help guide you is
  • 08:40 a way to start building those connections and then you realize that, one, you're not
  • 08:44 alone and you realize that people are very much interested in your success.
  • 08:49 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks, Daryl.
  • 08:51 A lot of really good programs and also opportunities so I hope viewers jot those down.
  • 08:56 Now, I want to ask you both, let's pivot a bit to talk about how the organization as
  • 09:04 a whole can help better promote this culture of inclusion.
  • 09:09 What role do you think we as staff have to play in supporting and also sustaining inclusion?
  • 09:15 Is there anything we should be more mindful or more aware of?
  • 09:19 Daryl, let me start with you.
  • 09:21 [Daryl] I think one of the things, and I'll just use
  • 09:24 my personal experience of having been at the World Bank for almost 15 years, I think stopping
  • 09:30 short of making assumptions about things and really engaging people.
  • 09:34 What we bring to the table is a diverse global population.
  • 09:40 Many times you are going to come in contact with someone who may not know a lot about
  • 09:45 your background, your experiences.
  • 09:48 There's an opportunity, one, to learn a tremendous amount about others and really enrich yourself
  • 09:54 but there's also that risk that if you just stop short of assumptions, you may assume
  • 09:58 that the way people engage you is not necessarily welcoming or inclusive.
  • 10:03 We always stress, get to know people.
  • 10:05 Understand that things aren't the same everywhere.
  • 10:07 But as we start to grow and learn from each other, there really is this richness that
  • 10:12 you get at the World Bank Group that I don't see anywhere else.
  • 10:15 [Srimathi Sridhar] That's certainly very true.
  • 10:18 Nadine, what would you have to say about this?
  • 10:21 [Nadine] Well, I actually believe that a lot starts
  • 10:25 with yourself.
  • 10:26 It really starts with self-awareness, being aware of who you are, being aware of, as Daryl
  • 10:33 alluded to, what your assumptions are or what your blind spots are.
  • 10:38 Everybody has them.
  • 10:40 Everybody has a blind spot.
  • 10:41 We all make assumptions.
  • 10:43 One thing that I really encourage everyone to do is, regardless of their level, to get
  • 10:49 involved, to not wait for leadership.
  • 10:53 I believe that we all are leaders regardless of what our work level is and I believe that
  • 10:59 we're all capable of identifying gaps that exist within the current environment.
  • 11:05 We also have the ability to change the culture or the environment.
  • 11:09 So, I encourage enlightenment, being enlightened about who you are, but also moving, doing
  • 11:16 something, looking to see what impact you can have to make the environment more inclusive
  • 11:22 or better for everyone.
  • 11:23 [Srimathi Sridhar] So, never assume and get involved is what
  • 11:27 I'm hearing from you both there.
  • 11:29 Daryl and Nadine, before we continue our conversation, I did want to acknowledge our online audience.
  • 11:34 Now, we share these episodes across our social channels, and we always get questions coming
  • 11:39 in from folks on how they can apply, what they can do to stand out.
  • 11:45 In the spirit of that, I wanted to ask a couple of job-specific questions to you both.
  • 11:49 The first is, what do you think helps applicants stand out, whether it's on a resume or even
  • 11:56 in person for a job interview?
  • 11:58 Who wants to take this one first?
  • 12:03 [Nadine] I don't mind jumping in.
  • 12:07 I'm looking at Daryl.
  • 12:08 I don't mind jumping in.
  • 12:10 I was just on a selection panel, so it's very timely.
  • 12:13 I do think most of all is to be authentic, to be yourself, to make sure that when you
  • 12:19 apply for a position, first of all, that you're qualified for it, not to just throw your hat
  • 12:25 in the ring because you want to work at the World Bank.
  • 12:27 To do some homework before you submit the application.
  • 12:31 Make sure that when you look at the selection criteria, that you actually meet the criteria,
  • 12:37 and if you meet the criteria only then to apply.
  • 12:40 I also think it's very important when you submit your application to realize that it's
  • 12:46 very important for us to know who you are.
  • 12:49 What is your value proposition?
  • 12:51 What is it that you bring to the table?
  • 12:54 What skills do you have and what makes you unique?
  • 12:57 And don't underestimate your uniqueness or your own brand.
  • 13:01 [Srimathi Sridhar] I love that.
  • 13:04 Daryl, what are your tips?
  • 13:05 [Daryl] I couldn't agree more with Nadine.
  • 13:08 Look, I think that you really have to thread the needle in really highlighting who you
  • 13:12 are and your unique attributes, but at the same time, you have to resonate with the job.
  • 13:18 Sometimes just taking a victory lap on your credentials and all your accomplishments,
  • 13:23 if they really don't resonate with how you could be successful in the job, is not as
  • 13:27 effective as simply standing out amongst all the other applicants, but really showing how
  • 13:33 you can deliver at the bank or in the specific job you're applying for.
  • 13:38 I think that's key.
  • 13:39 I think it's a subtle step that people often miss.
  • 13:42 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks, Daryl.
  • 13:45 This next question, I love this question, it's all about rejection.
  • 13:50 We've all faced this at some point in our professional career.
  • 13:53 You apply for a job.
  • 13:54 You don't get it or you apply and you apply, but you just never seem to hear back.
  • 13:59 You just can't get the job that you want.
  • 14:01 How do you overcome this feeling of rejection and still have that fire in you, so to say,
  • 14:09 to keep trying elsewhere?
  • 14:11 Maybe, do you guys have an example of a time that you overcame rejection in your professional
  • 14:18 career?
  • 14:19 Daryl, let me turn to you first.
  • 14:21 [Daryl] Sure.
  • 14:22 I'll answer the second question first.
  • 14:24 Probably we don't have enough time to count the number of rejections I've experienced
  • 14:29 in applying for jobs.
  • 14:30 I think it simply comes down to your mental GPS.
  • 14:34 If you're looking to enrich your career, if you're looking to start your career, or if
  • 14:37 you're to change your career, if you do that as an action out of aspiration, you're trying
  • 14:42 to get somewhere.
  • 14:43 If you're doing that out of desperation, you may find yourself falling into things that
  • 14:48 you're not that passionate for.
  • 14:49 You may not do the best interview.
  • 14:51 You may not even realize it, you may do things on autopilot.
  • 14:53 So, really invest the time in, one, making sure that this is what you want to do and
  • 14:59 then, two, making sure that you stand out amongst anybody else that wants to compete
  • 15:03 with you for it.
  • 15:04 If it doesn't go your way, feel free to ask for feedback.
  • 15:09 It's not a token gesture if you don't get something and someone sends you a rejection
  • 15:13 letter.
  • 15:14 Follow up.
  • 15:15 Find out what maybe you could have done more of, or what maybe you can do to expand your
  • 15:18 horizon or if anything, it's a way to stay on the radar screen of others as future opportunities
  • 15:23 may arise.
  • 15:24 [Srimathi Sridhar] That's really good.
  • 15:26 That's a really good tip.
  • 15:27 I don't think a lot of people know or feel comfortable doing that and I think it is important
  • 15:32 to reach out, right?
  • 15:33 After you hear back.
  • 15:37 Nadine, what are your thoughts on this?
  • 15:40 [Nadine] I know what I'm going to share is a bit counterintuitive
  • 15:45 but I do believe one of my favorite authors is Miguel Ruiz.
  • 15:49 One of his four principles is, don't take anything personal.
  • 15:54 When you're rejected, it is very natural to take it very personally and also to actually
  • 16:02 really feel not only disappointed but discouraged.
  • 16:04 So, I think it's very important to, when you do get that rejection, and yes, I have been
  • 16:10 rejected at work many times, to see it as a learning opportunity, to look at, "Well,
  • 16:16 what did I take away from that?"
  • 16:18 What I took away from it was I had an opportunity to practice my interviewing skills.
  • 16:23 I had an opportunity to get in front of people who I would not have ordinarily been able
  • 16:27 to get in front of.
  • 16:29 As Daryl said, also asking for feedback and not burning bridges.
  • 16:35 I have seen for myself an egregious case where an individual was so angry that they totally
  • 16:43 burned their bridges with the World Bank Group.
  • 16:45 You don't want to do that.
  • 16:46 So, see it as a learning opportunity, see it as a stepping stone and I actually believe
  • 16:51 if it's the right job, you will get it.
  • 16:54 [Srimathi Sridhar] That is so true.
  • 16:58 Daryl and Nadine, thanks for taking the time to answer a couple of those questions.
  • 17:02 They're always very popular so it's good to get both of your take on it.
  • 17:08 But let's now get back to our conversation.
  • 17:11 I want to touch now on this concept of racial minority.
  • 17:16 Because the World Bank Group is global, this concept of identifying as a racial minority,
  • 17:21 it means something different in each country.
  • 17:25 What does it mean to you as an African American working at the World Bank?
  • 17:29 Nadine, let me start with you.
  • 17:31 [Nadine] Well, for me being a racial minority, it goes
  • 17:36 into the numbers.
  • 17:38 To me, what it means to me is when I don't see people that look like me in the environment
  • 17:44 that I'm in.
  • 17:45 So, it's a statistic, even though I don't like numbers.
  • 17:48 If you look in the setting and you don't see yourself reflected, that means you're a minority.
  • 17:53 Also, if I don't see myself reflected in the culture and the artifacts of the institution,
  • 18:00 that's also an indication of being of a minority status.
  • 18:04 To me, it's about the numbers.
  • 18:06 How many of us are there?
  • 18:08 Also whether our culture is included.
  • 18:11 I do believe the World Bank has made a lot of effort in this area.
  • 18:16 It still has more work to do like most organizations, but that's how I define it in an organizational
  • 18:23 perspective.
  • 18:24 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thank you, Nadine, and Daryl, what does racial
  • 18:29 minority mean to you?
  • 18:30 [Daryl] For me, it's the experience that I've lived
  • 18:35 my whole life and I've brought with me to the World Bank.
  • 18:38 In many ways they parallel each other.
  • 18:41 So, as Nadine mentioned, it's feeling like the only one or one of very few in a large
  • 18:48 sea, feeling that your culture or your experience is not necessarily part of the mainstream
  • 18:54 lexicon.
  • 18:55 At work, it's the same thing.
  • 18:59 If you think about at the lineage of the World Bank and its establishment, we have lots of
  • 19:03 art around our buildings and you see pictures of what the place looked like 70 years ago,
  • 19:08 60 years ago, 50 years ago, and you see that parallel, that things that I've experienced
  • 19:13 in my personal life in the United States, for example, you've seen that change happening
  • 19:18 at the World Bank Group as well.
  • 19:20 For me, they go hand in glove, but it is exactly that feeling of feeling that your experience
  • 19:26 and your attributes, and your culture is not necessarily part of the mainstream or the
  • 19:32 structure itself.
  • 19:33 [Srimathi Sridhar] Right.
  • 19:34 It really feels like it's a much more conscious awareness of who you are, right?
  • 19:39 [Daryl] Yeah.
  • 19:40 [Srimathi Sridhar] Now, we touched a bit earlier on the subject
  • 19:43 of racial discrimination when talking about the race agenda.
  • 19:48 How would you say the World Bank Group has worked to address all other forms of discrimination?
  • 19:54 Daryl, let me start with you.
  • 19:56 [Daryl] I mean, I think I would need a little bit
  • 20:00 of time to go through the list of mechanisms that we have formally and informally, but
  • 20:04 I think it starts with the premise.
  • 20:06 The position of the organization is very clear, that it stands against all forms of discrimination
  • 20:14 and harassment.
  • 20:15 To support staff, there are light ways for staff to feel protected and safe and to anonymously
  • 20:20 report issues.
  • 20:21 There are also formal mechanisms, and there are also task forces at the highest levels
  • 20:27 of the organization that really look at how the culture of the organization needs to be
  • 20:32 rewired to make sure that it's ring fenced even stronger against forms of discrimination.
  • 20:37 But it really starts with building the culture and maintaining this dialogue with staff that
  • 20:41 it's safe to speak up.
  • 20:45 I mentioned earlier about this being a global context and culturally, not everybody feels
  • 20:50 comfortable speaking up when things happen.
  • 20:53 Not everybody feels safe or protected raising issues to either their manager or to our internal
  • 20:59 justice system.
  • 21:01 What we've simply encouraged is we will keep doubling down on making sure that those mechanisms
  • 21:05 are available for staff to feel protected, number one, and then two, to have a strong
  • 21:10 and swift follow up and accountability on actions that do happen.
  • 21:13 But it runs across the gamut, whether it's sexual harassment, racial discrimination,
  • 21:18 retaliation, and other forms of discrimination and harassment.
  • 21:22 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks so much, Daryl.
  • 21:24 What are your thoughts on this, Nadine?
  • 21:27 [Nadine] Well, one thing that I'm very happy and that
  • 21:32 I've seen at the World Bank is that there are many very active groups, which I'm part
  • 21:37 of several, that are, for example, the World Bank has a very active Women's Network, as
  • 21:43 well as IFC, our private sector part of the World Bank Group.
  • 21:48 We also have several disability working groups.
  • 21:52 We also have, for groups that are not represented in general, they have a platform within the
  • 21:59 World Bank Group.
  • 22:00 They also have a lot of participation in our staff association, which is more like our
  • 22:06 union.
  • 22:07 So, the staff association actively represents staff and it also ensures that all staff are
  • 22:13 protected regardless of what affinity group or what racial group, ethnic group, or even
  • 22:21 sexual orientation they have.
  • 22:23 So, I believe that we've seen that.
  • 22:25 I am part of the internal justice services of the World Bank Group.
  • 22:29 We have made a conscious effort to try our best to reach staff and to assure them that
  • 22:35 if they use our services, that they can use it without any retribution or retaliation.
  • 22:41 But as Daryl has alluded, we're still working on that within the organization.
  • 22:46 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thanks, Nadine.
  • 22:49 We're at the last question of our episode today.
  • 22:53 Before I let the both of you go, I would love to hear from you, what would be your piece
  • 22:58 of advice for professionals that want to work with us here at the World Bank Group, and
  • 23:05 maybe deriving from your own personal experiences?
  • 23:08 What's helped you get to where you are today?
  • 23:10 Nadine, let me start it with you.
  • 23:12 [Nadine] Well, for me, what has helped me is that I
  • 23:17 know what my strengths are, and I know what my weaknesses are.
  • 23:21 I believe having a very strong sense of who you are, the good, the bad, and the ugly is
  • 23:26 very important.
  • 23:28 None of us is perfect.
  • 23:31 A lot of us think we're great at everything, but we're not.
  • 23:35 So, I'm very realistic in my abilities.
  • 23:38 I actually have taken inventory at different times in my career as to what I can do and
  • 23:44 where I can make the most impact.
  • 23:46 I have actually strategically networked with individuals who can mentor me to help me get
  • 23:52 to the next step.
  • 23:54 Not only that, but I've also mentored other people.
  • 23:56 So, to me, it's not just a upward trajectory.
  • 24:00 I've learned that my career has actually blossomed through lateral movement.
  • 24:06 I think a lot of success has to do with first knowing who you are, building on your strengths,
  • 24:13 and also networking.
  • 24:15 I think relationships are key in any job.
  • 24:18 It's very important that you not lose sight of individuals.
  • 24:21 [Srimathi Sridhar] Thank you so much, Nadine.
  • 24:25 Finally, Daryl, what is your piece of advice?
  • 24:28 [Nadine] To Nadine's point, I think self-awareness
  • 24:31 and learning about yourself is key, and learning as much as you can about the place you want
  • 24:36 to work is key.
  • 24:37 There's all sorts of resources that people can take advantage of to learn about the World
  • 24:42 Bank, for example.
  • 24:43 But it's important to form your own opinion of the organization and how you can contribute.
  • 24:49 Then even as you come into the organization, to Nadine's point, making sure that it's not
  • 24:54 a destination, it is the arrival because you reboot.
  • 24:58 As soon as you do that again, you should still continue learning about yourself.
  • 25:02 You should still continue talking to people and making sure that you have an informed
  • 25:05 view of things.
  • 25:06 I think the bank does have a tremendous support system.
  • 25:08 Nadine alluded to this.
  • 25:10 I mean, you can join affinity groups.
  • 25:12 I'm a member of the African American Association.
  • 25:14 We have the African Descent Alliance, for example.
  • 25:17 There's the Women's Network that Nadine mentioned.
  • 25:19 But it's a continuous process of how you got to the organization.
  • 25:24 In a way, it should also be how you continue to grow and thrive in the organization.
  • 25:28 Don't stop by getting in the door.
  • 25:31 Continue that process of self-awareness and self-growth, as well as expanding your network
  • 25:35 and learning more about the organization.
  • 25:37 [Srimathi Sridhar] Well, on that inspiring note, I want to thank
  • 25:42 you and Nadine for joining me here today on Behind the Mission and really telling me more
  • 25:48 about yourselves, but also what the World Bank Group has been doing around race and
  • 25:52 inclusion as we celebrate Black History Month.
  • 25:55 It's really been a pleasure speaking with you both, and I hope that the audience is
  • 25:59 walking away with a much better understanding around what the institution is doing on this
  • 26:05 important agenda.
  • 26:06 So, for folks that tuned in online, if you joined our conversation late or you simply
  • 26:11 want to watch it back again at a later time, a replay will be available on our World Bank
  • 26:16 LinkedIn channel, as well as on World Bank Live.
  • 26:19 That's live.worldbank.org, where you can also catch up on other live series and events.
  • 26:25 For the latest career openings, be sure to visit our job site and stay connected to us.
  • 26:30 Give us a follow.
  • 26:31 We are on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
  • 26:34 I'm Srimathi Sridhar.
  • 26:35 Thanks again so much for joining me and I'll see you next time.
  • 26:40 Good-bye.
  • 26:42 [Nadine] Bye-bye.
  • 26:47 [Daryl] Good-bye.
  • 26:52 Thank you.
  • 26:57 [Nadine] Thank you.

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