Political Economy of Recovery: Why Resilient Recovery Is an Imperative for the Development Agenda

Political Economy of Recovery: Why Resilient Recovery Is an Imperative for the Development Agenda


Date: Wednesday, September 10th, 2014
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. ET (13:30 – 15:00 GMT or convert time)
Location: Online

Photo Credit: Arnold Jumpay, Philippines

The live stream has concluded. Watch the replay.

Over the past thirty years, natural disasters have caused an estimated US $3.8 trillion in total reported losses. The frequency and intensity of these disasters has increased with the rise of climate change, urbanization and population growth. In developing countries, disasters destroy hard-won development gains and curtail development efforts for years. Rebuilding after a disaster is a humanitarian imperative, as well as an opportunity to build back better by investing in more resilient development.

Feature Story: From Adversity to Opportunity: How the Aftermath of a Disaster Can Lead to a Safer Future

The opening plenary discussed how prevailing national political structures, policies, and economic factors impact post-disaster recovery. The plenary also set the stage for building consensus on the importance of resilient recovery for the post-2015 development framework.

 

Follow the event on Twitter by using #2014WRC & #ResilientRecovery

 

Live Blog Political Economy of Recovery: Why Resilient Recovery is an Imperative for the Development
 


Featuring

President, World Bank Group
CEO, Sustainable Energy for All and Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All
Under-Secretary-General and Associate Administrator, United Nations Development Programme
Union Minister of State for Home Affairs, India
General Counsel and Chief International Officer, American Red Cross
Author, Journalist (Moderator)
Read what others are asking
Joseph Iorlaphine Ulaha
Nigeria
1.How possible are we going to tackle the natural disaster to be able to minimise losses? 2. Climate change has been identified among other factors responsible for natural disaster, how sincere are we in this fight against climate change? 3. Urbanisation is at increase due to population explosion. How are we going to tackle population to limit urban expansion? 4. We are aware of increased CO2 emission in our cities by automobile, industries, heating of homes & offices? Can we stop industrial production or automobile manufacturing or heating? 5.How many countries in developing world are ready to enforced the use of mass transit means of transport, bicycles, develop rail system as in advanced countries? 6. How many developments are complying with EIA requirements when trees are cut off? 7.How many cities develop from a pre-planned master plan? 8.How many Governments will be ready to pay for resilient recovery funds or donations? 9.How many governments will be able to implement development transparently without squandering or diversion? 10. Where do we go from here? Let alone of natural disasters, wars are here and there killing millions & destroying properties worthy of billions of dollars? 11. Environmental pollutions from industries,fishing with chemicals, agrochemicals, poor farming practices? May God help us on planet earth in the near catastrophe that await us in the universe due to human activities.
Dr. Ananh Norasingh
Malaysia
Over the past thirty years, natural disasters have caused an estimated US $3.8 trillion in total reported losses. The frequency and intensity of these disasters has increased with the rise of climate change, urbanization and population growth. Rebuilding after a disaster is a humanitarian imperative, as well as an opportunity to build back better by investing in more resilient development. The post-disaster recovery is not the solution to the problems, We should look for a deeper view, that is to slow down the climate change, so there will be enough time to recover, In the meantime, find an expert in Bioneer to setup a proper zone to text the change of climate at that zone, then expand the zone….
John Koroma
Sierra Leone
In the advent of biological attacks that affects poor countries like Sierra Leone's current EBOLA crisis, how does the bank ensures that understanding cultural values and biological signs and symptoms are managed desperately without affecting each other?
Katherine Ellington
United States
In the age of climate change, increasing natural disasters Are there global indicators (indicies) related to international invstement strategies. Is there a "resilience equity market" for the future?